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Super PAC Men: How political consultants took a Fort Worth oilman on a wild ride

The head of a Texas oil dynasty joined the parade of wealthy political donors, aiming to flip the Senate to Republicans. By the time consultants were done with him, the war chest was drained and fraud allegations were flying

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Bon Appétit: New French restaurant dishes out the finest in Fort Worth

Barely open six months, Le Cep, a contemporary French restaurant proffering fine dining, is stirring up Fort Worth’s culinary scene.

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Bridge collapse on I-35 north of Austin

SALADO, Texas (AP) — Emergency crews are responding to a reported bridge collapse along an interstate in Central Texas.

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Latin-inspired restaurant set to open in downtown Fort Worth

Downtown Fort Worth’s dining scene is about to get spicier with the opening of a new restaurant featuring Latin-inspired coastal cuisine.

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Amazon begins Prime Now program in Dallas area

If you just have to have it now, as in one hour, you can, at least in the Dallas area, as Amazon.com Inc. announced Thursday it will offer Prime Now.

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Senators question electricity pricing plan

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Senate's Natural Resources Committee has called the Public Utility Commission to talk about the pricing of electricity.

Committee Chairman Troy Fraser called commissioner to testify Monday amid reports it could change the wholesale electricity market.

Commissioners have long debated how to make sure Texas has enough electricity. Demand is growing, but generators say prices are too low to make investments in new equipment worthwhile.

Some experts suggest raising prices, while others want Texas to pay generators to keep standby capacity available when demand peaks, or equipment shuts down unexpectedly.

Fraser helped design the current market that only pays when electricity is bought. He's been critical of paying generators to keep reserves.

Some utilities also oppose a capacity market, saying it could cost consumers $4 billion a year.

 

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