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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Woman cited by President as Obamacare success story frustrated by sign up process

President Barack Obama proposed a solution to the problem of insurance policy cancellations under Obamacare on Thursday, November 14, 2013. Obama said the Obamacare rollout has been "rough so far" and he has been deeply concerned about it.

Credit: CNN

 

Jim Acosta

CNN Senior White House Correspondent


(CNN) -- Washington state resident Jessica Sanford was bursting with pride when President Obama mentioned her story during a Rose Garden event on health care reform last month at the White House.


"Who wouldn't?" Sanford asks. "I'm a nobody really to have him mention my story."


Back in October, Sanford had written a letter to the White House to share her good news. The 48-year-old single mother of a teenage son diagnosed with ADHD had just purchased what she considered to be affordable insurance on the Washington state exchange.


"I was ecstatic. I couldn't wait to call the doctor for an appointment on January 2nd," Sanford told CNN about the feeling she had when she first enrolled.


Her heartfelt letter made it to the President's hands and then into his October 21 speech.


"'I was crying the other day when I signed up. So much stress lifted.'" Obama said, reading from Sanford's letter.


The president said Sanford's story was proof, despite the technical problems with the healthcare.gov < http://healthcare.gov> website, that the Affordable Care Act was working.


"That's what the Affordable Care Act is all about. The point is, the essence of the law -- the health insurance that's available to people -- is working just fine," Obama said.


But then, after Obama mentioned her story, Sanford started having problems. Sanford said she received another letter informing her the Washington state health exchange had miscalculated her eligibility for a tax credit.


In other words, her monthly insurance bill had shot up from $198 a month (she had initially said $169 a month to the White House but she switched plans) to $280 a month for the same "gold" plan offered by the state exchange.


Sanford said she was frustrated with the state's error. But she decided to purchase the new plan and thought everything was fine.


It wasn't fine. Last week, Sanford received another letter from the Washington state exchange, stating there had been another problem, a "system error" that resulted in some "applicants to qualify for higher than allowed health insurance premium tax credits."


The letter said the state exchange was "disappointed to have discovered this issue" and apologized.


The result was a higher quote, which Sanford said was for $390 per month for a "silver" plan with a higher deductible. Still too expensive


A cheaper "bronze" plan, Sanford said, came in at $324 per month, but also with a high deductible -- also not in her budget.


Then another letter from the state exchange with even worse news.


"Your household has been determined eligible for a Federal Tax Credit of $0.00 to help cover the cost of your monthly health insurance premium payments," the latest letter said.


"I had a good cry," Sanford said about her reaction to the latest news from the state.


As a self-employed court reporter, the new quote was simply out of her range.


"This is it. I'm not getting insurance," Sanford told CNN. "That's where it stands right now unless they fix it."


Sanford, an Obama supporter who voted for the president twice, is careful to say she blames the state of Washington's online marketplace for the mixed signals and not the White House.


She is sorry Obama mentioned her during the October 21 speech.


"I feel awful about it. I support (the Affordable Care Act)," Sanford said.


But the messy rollout in the other Washington, the nation's capital, was not far from her mind.


"What the hell? Why is it the same story as the federal government?" Sanford says in disgust with the Washington state exchange. "They didn't have it ready."


"They screwed up," she added.


Sanford reiterated her frustration in a post to the Washington HealthPlanFinder's Facebook page last Friday.


"Wow. You guys really screwed me over," Sanford wrote. "Now I have been priced out and will not be able to afford the plans you offer. But, I get to pay $95 and up for not having health insurance. I am so incredibly disappointed and saddened. You majorly screwed up."


In response, a HealthplanFinder posting tried to direct Sanford to a broker for help.


"Jessica, we are very sad and disappointed that the tax credit miscalculation affected you so heavily," the comment read, suggesting she try to find a new plan on the site. Sanford responded on Facebook the issue was affordability.

 

Bethany Frey, a spokeswoman for Washington HealthPlanFinder told CNN on Monday night, "I'm already looking into this with our client specialist team. I'll let you know what I hear."


 

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