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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Judge denies $20M severance deal for AMR CEO

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DAVID KOENIG,AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — A federal bankruptcy judge has denied a proposed $20 million severance payment for the CEO of American Airlines as part of the company's merger with US Airways.

The judge ruled Thursday that the proposed payment to CEO Tom Horton exceeded limits that Congress set for bankruptcy cases in 2005.

The U.S. trustee's office, part of the Department of Justice, had objected to Horton's compensation. Judge Sean Lane declined to approve the payment during a hearing on March 28, but he didn't issue a ruling until Thursday.

Although Lane denied the severance as part of the merger, he left open the possibility of a payment as part of American's final reorganization plan, which has not yet been filed. American Airlines spokesman Mike Trevino said the airline intends to address Horton's compensation that way.

Lane has approved the plan for American Airlines parent AMR Corp. to merge with US Airways Group Inc. in a deal that would create the world's largest airline. The merger is being reviewed by U.S. antitrust regulators.

Under the merger deal, the new company will be called American Airlines but run by US Airways CEO Doug Parker. Horton would serve as chairman for a few months and then leave with a severance of $19.875 million equally divided between cash and stock.

The trustee's office argued that severance payments to insiders such as CEOs can't be more than 10 times the average severance pay for non-management employees.

AMR argued that the limit didn't apply because the payment would be made by the new company formed after AMR emerges from bankruptcy protection.

But Lane called that argument "somewhat of a legal fiction" because the money was Horton's reward for his work at AMR, not at the new company, which will be called American Airlines Group Inc.

AMR also argued that Horton's payoff was similar to payments made to CEOs in other airline mergers. But Lane said the earlier deals — Delta's purchase of Northwest and United's merger with Continental — didn't occur under bankruptcy and its limits on insider severance payments.

 

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