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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth Chamber names Small Business of the Year winners

A trampoline recreation business; an oilfield services company; a longtime aviation maintenance firm; a maker of electrical wiring harnesses. Those were the wide variety of businesses that received the 2015 Small Business of the Year Award from the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Forest Park undergoes 'road diet'

 

After several delays, Forest Park Boulevard has undergone its "road diet."

Forest Park Boulevard between Rosedale Street and Park Hill Drive is now a three-lane thoroughfare.

Also planned are signalization and intersection improvements for where Forest Park intersects with Rosedale, Mistletoe Boulevard, Park Place Avenue and Park Hill. The term “road diet” denotes a reduction in lanes.

The project was delayed several times as the city grappled with contractor issues. The latest snag occurred after the contractor originally set to handle the work went bankrupt, forcing the city to find another firm.

Although cost estimates total $70,000 – exceeding the $50,000 minimum at which capital expenditures require City Council approval – the project requires no council approval because its expenses were authorized in the current city budget.

Some residents living in nearby Mistletoe Heights and Berkeley Place neighborhoods had voiced concern that speeding motorists created safety hazards. Traffic studies confirmed 41 crashes along the stretch between 2009 and 2011. - Staff reports

 

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