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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

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Thirsty? There's a wine shortage

 

Aaron Smith

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- There's just not enough wine in the world, says Morgan Stanley, and the problem is only going to get worse.

The industry is experiencing an "undersupply of nearly 300 million cases" a year, according to a report from Morgan Stanley Research.

Australia-based analysts Tom Kierath and Crystal Wang say the shortage comes despite the fact that there are one million wine producers globally, making 2.8 million cases each year. About half of that comes from Europe.

But that's not enough to keep up with worldwide demand

Global production fell by more than 5% last year - to its lowest level since the 1960s - primarily due to bad weather in France and Argentina.

Production in Europe alone dropped 10% in 2012, the report said. That same year, worldwide consumption rose by 1%.

The French consume the most wine, followed by Americans, and then the Chinese.

Wine has become particularly popular in China, as the economy booms and the standard of living there rises. China is also producing more wine of its own, said the report.

America consumes 12% of the world's wine but produces just 8%. And the U.S. is only getting thirstier ; consumption rose 2% last year.

The U.S. wine making industry is also growing. The number of American wineries has "expanded dramatically" in the last 15 years, according to the report. But most of them are "boutique" operators rather than major producers, so they're not driving any real growth in supply.

And there is little reason to believe that global wine production will pick up any time soon.

Morgan Stanley said that output from newer producers like the U.S., Argentina, Chile, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa has already peaked.

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