Join The Discussion

 

Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

read more >

Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

read more >

Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

read more >

Two Fort Worth Baylor medical properties acquired

Baylor Surgical Hospital of Fort Worth and Baylor Surgical Hospital Integrated Medical Facility are among three facilities acquired by Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II Inc.

read more >

Fort Worth minority business receives nationwide grant

Cuevas Distribution Inc., a minority- and woman-owned business in Fort Worth, is one of 20 small businesses nationwide to receive a $150,000 grant from Chase as part of the Mission Main Street program.

read more >

 

'Reverse Litter' campaign begins

 

Jack Z. Smith
Special Projects Reporter
Fort Worth Business Press

It's an appallingly common sight--the beauty of North Texas creeks, rivers and lakes marred by unsightly and nasty litter in their waters.
Most of that litter -- an estimated 80 percent-- actually started out on land, according to the Tarrant Regional Water District, which operates four reservoirs that provide water for much of this area.


The TRWD and the cities of Fort Worth, Arlington, Mansfield, Denton and Dallas are combining forces to tackle the problem.
Theyre cranking up a "Reverse Litter" campaign this week with television and radio advertisements calling on North Texans to take a “Ten on Tuesday” pledge to help reduce litter that ends up in our precious water sources.
“We want North Texans to commit to picking up at least 10 pieces of trash on Tuesdays, whether that’s cleaning out loose trash in their vehicles or picking up litter on their walk into the office or whatever is the easiest way to participate,” TRWD Communications Manager Chad Lorance said.


You can make the Ten on Tuesday pledge by signing up at www.reverselitter.com. Or you can join on Facebook at facebook.com/ReverseLitter.
“If we can get 5,000 people to go online and take the pledge, we could eliminate 2.6 million pieces of trash each year that would eventually reach our waterways,” Lorance said.
The TRWD , based in Fort Worth, is the chief supplier of raw water to Tarrant County. Cleaning up litter costs Metroplex cities an estimated $23 million a year, the agency said.


In a typical situation, rainfall washes litter into a storm drain, which carries it into creeks and rivers that then transmit it into area reservorirs that are the primary source of water we drink.
Representatives of the Reverse Litter campaign also will attend area festivals and other events to sign up more people to take the "Ten on Tuesday" pledge.
The campaign also is planning an education program to encourage young people to reduce littering.
 

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?