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Dee Lincoln bringing restaurant to Fort Worth's Museum Place

Dee Lincoln is bringing her restaurant to Fort Worth’s Museum Place project. The 5,300-square-foot restaurant, at 3280 W. Seventh St., is expected to open in the first quarter of

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Residential land at Chisholm Trail Ranch purchased

Stratford Land, Legacy Capital Co. and the Walton Group of Cos. have snapped up 268 acres of residential land at Chisholm Trail Ranch in Fort Worth.

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Fort Worth to consider adopting 15-year Cavile Place redevelopment plan

The 300-unit Cavile Place housing project in Southeast Fort Worth would be razed and replaced in phases, with a significant number of the units redistributed into the neighborhood.

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Fort Worth council members approve Cavile Place redevelopment plan

The vote kicks off what officials say will be a 10-15-year implementation.

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Former RadioShack CEO caught in protest over ousted leader at Market Basket

Employees protest over many things: higher wages, better benefits, safer working conditions in their jobs. What's far more unusual, if not unprecedented, is to see workers, organized by senior managers, stage a rebellion to help their CEO get his job back.

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'Reverse Litter' campaign begins

 

Jack Z. Smith
Special Projects Reporter
Fort Worth Business Press

It's an appallingly common sight--the beauty of North Texas creeks, rivers and lakes marred by unsightly and nasty litter in their waters.
Most of that litter -- an estimated 80 percent-- actually started out on land, according to the Tarrant Regional Water District, which operates four reservoirs that provide water for much of this area.


The TRWD and the cities of Fort Worth, Arlington, Mansfield, Denton and Dallas are combining forces to tackle the problem.
Theyre cranking up a "Reverse Litter" campaign this week with television and radio advertisements calling on North Texans to take a “Ten on Tuesday” pledge to help reduce litter that ends up in our precious water sources.
“We want North Texans to commit to picking up at least 10 pieces of trash on Tuesdays, whether that’s cleaning out loose trash in their vehicles or picking up litter on their walk into the office or whatever is the easiest way to participate,” TRWD Communications Manager Chad Lorance said.


You can make the Ten on Tuesday pledge by signing up at www.reverselitter.com. Or you can join on Facebook at facebook.com/ReverseLitter.
“If we can get 5,000 people to go online and take the pledge, we could eliminate 2.6 million pieces of trash each year that would eventually reach our waterways,” Lorance said.
The TRWD , based in Fort Worth, is the chief supplier of raw water to Tarrant County. Cleaning up litter costs Metroplex cities an estimated $23 million a year, the agency said.


In a typical situation, rainfall washes litter into a storm drain, which carries it into creeks and rivers that then transmit it into area reservorirs that are the primary source of water we drink.
Representatives of the Reverse Litter campaign also will attend area festivals and other events to sign up more people to take the "Ten on Tuesday" pledge.
The campaign also is planning an education program to encourage young people to reduce littering.
 

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Training Camp
Training camp is starting this week. How will the Dallas Cowboys do this season?