Join The Discussion

 

26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

read more >

UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

read more >

Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

read more >

Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

read more >

Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

read more >

 

Crude oil, other commodities rise on US debt deal

The Associated Press

 

NEW YORK (AP) — Crude oil and other commodities rose Wednesday after the Senate agreed to a deal that would avoid a U.S. default and reopen the government after a partial shutdown of 16 days.

Oil for November delivery rose $1.08, or 1.1 percent, to $102.29 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Most other energy futures rose.

Stocks and bonds rallied after Senate leaders announced they had reached a compromise on extending the government's borrowing authority and reopening the government. Energy futures also rose as a potential threat to U.S. financial markets and the economy appeared to wane.

Congress raced to pass the legislation Wednesday ahead of a Thursday deadline after which the government would exhaust its ability to borrow money to pay its bills, putting the U.S. at risk of defaulting on its debt.

In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline rose 4 cents to $2.70 a gallon, natural gas fell 2 cents to $3.77 per 1,000 cubic feet and heating oil gained 2 cents to $3.04 a gallon.

Gold for December delivery edged up $9.10 to $1,282.30 an ounce. Other metals futures also rose.

December silver rose 17.4 cents to $21.365 an ounce, January platinum rose $14.80 to $1,398.20 an ounce and December palladium rose $7.25 to $713.55 an ounce.

High-grade copper for December delivery was unchanged at $3.308 a pound.

Crop futures ended mixed.

December wheat fell 4.25 cents to $6.815 a bushel, December corn fell three-quarters of a cent to $4.4275 a bushel and November soybeans fell 9.5 cents to $12.765 a bushel.

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?