Join The Discussion

 

On the rise: Kolache bakery stirs up Fort Worth breakfast scene

Investment bankers Wade Chappell and Greg Saltsman didn’t know anything about baking or how to make kolaches when they started their own kolache delivery business in Fort Worth. The two friends just loved eating the Czech pastries but couldn’t find a product they liked locally.

read more >

Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

read more >

Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

read more >

Fort Worth denies three building permits amid TCU overlay debate

City Council members will consider appeals on the three single-family permits Tuesday.

read more >

Taking a RIDE: Fort Worth-based network saddles up for broadcast

As a media executive and owner of television studios, Michael Fletcher has been pitched some ideas before. Like the one from a local preacher who wanted to bust prostitutes and drug dealers – on air – and urge them to come to God.

read more >

Jury finds BP negligent in Texas emissions event

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — BP was negligent and responsible for a 41-day emissions event in 2010 at its Texas City refinery, but there isn't enough evidence linking the pollution to illnesses, a Galveston jury has found.

BP PLC has said that 500,000 pounds of toxic chemicals were released into the air when there was a technical problem at the refinery. The emissions event coincided with the company's efforts to plug a major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

The jury on Oct. 10 unanimously agreed that the company was responsible for the pollution, but only one person wanted to award damages. Three people who said they became ill due to the pollution testified at the trial that began Sept. 11. The trial was designed as a test for a larger suit that includes 45,000 people. The jury deliberated for two days and three hours before reaching a verdict.

BP reached a settlement with Texas in November 2011 to pay an unprecedented $50 million fine for repeated violations at the aging refinery along the Gulf Coast. The settlement included the 2010 emissions event. The company also faces a $1 billion class-action lawsuit for a 15-day gas leak in November 2011 that residents say made them sick.

Marathon Petroleum Corp. last October agreed to buy the refinery.

"Today's verdict affirms BP's view that no one suffered any injury as a result of the flaring of the BP ultracracker flare during April and May 2010," BP spokesman Scott Dean was quoted as saying by the Galveston Daily News.

Tony Buzbee, the attorney for the residents, said he was surprised by the verdict.

"But I respect juries," Buzbee told the Houston Chronicle, adding that he learned at this trial a few things that will help with the remaining cases.

 

 

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?