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Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

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Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

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Alliance's Hillwood Commons lands first tenant

A large title insurance, property valuation and settlement services company is the first tenant at Hillwood Commons I, an office complex at Alliance Town Center.

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Jury finds BP negligent in Texas emissions event

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — BP was negligent and responsible for a 41-day emissions event in 2010 at its Texas City refinery, but there isn't enough evidence linking the pollution to illnesses, a Galveston jury has found.

BP PLC has said that 500,000 pounds of toxic chemicals were released into the air when there was a technical problem at the refinery. The emissions event coincided with the company's efforts to plug a major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

The jury on Oct. 10 unanimously agreed that the company was responsible for the pollution, but only one person wanted to award damages. Three people who said they became ill due to the pollution testified at the trial that began Sept. 11. The trial was designed as a test for a larger suit that includes 45,000 people. The jury deliberated for two days and three hours before reaching a verdict.

BP reached a settlement with Texas in November 2011 to pay an unprecedented $50 million fine for repeated violations at the aging refinery along the Gulf Coast. The settlement included the 2010 emissions event. The company also faces a $1 billion class-action lawsuit for a 15-day gas leak in November 2011 that residents say made them sick.

Marathon Petroleum Corp. last October agreed to buy the refinery.

"Today's verdict affirms BP's view that no one suffered any injury as a result of the flaring of the BP ultracracker flare during April and May 2010," BP spokesman Scott Dean was quoted as saying by the Galveston Daily News.

Tony Buzbee, the attorney for the residents, said he was surprised by the verdict.

"But I respect juries," Buzbee told the Houston Chronicle, adding that he learned at this trial a few things that will help with the remaining cases.

 

 

 

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