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New arena at Will Rogers takes shape


The proposed Will Rogers Memorial Center arena continues to take shape as voters head for a Nov. 4 election to decide whether to approve new taxes to help pay for the $450 million facility.

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Ex Rangers manager Washington apologizes for 'breaking wife's trust'

IRVING, Texas (AP) — Former Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington says he is embarrassed for 'breaking his wife's trust.'

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Cooking Class: Fort Worth chef brings home the gold

Toques off to Timothy Prefontaine. The executive chef at the iconic Fort Worth Club is currently the best in the nation, according to the American Culinary Federation. Prefontaine earned the title of 2014 U.S.A.’s Chef of the

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Fort Worth firm 'simplifies' advertising

Reaching customers requires more than price slashing and flashy ads. In today’s competitive marketplace, machines – not men and women – are essential to tapping new markets and

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Trinity Valley School leader to leave in May 2015

Gary Krahn, head of school for the past eight years at Trinity Valley School in Fort Worth, will leave his position in May 2015 when he and his wife Paula will move

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Texans bypass website glitches to get health care

RAMIT PLUSHNICK-MASTI, Associated Press

HOUSTON (AP) — Luis Veloz wasn't going to wait for the federal government to work out the kinks in its website before enrolling in the nation's new health insurance system. Instead, he rushed to fill out a paper application and mailed it in, eager to have a plan that would prevent him from racking up major medical bills like his parents.

As Texas residents encountered difficulties with the website for a second day, those trained to assist with the process said callers are simply asking for a nearby location where they can complete the process the old-fashioned way: in person and on paper.

Veloz, a 19-year-old community college student, was forced to withdraw from Southern Methodist University in Dallas after his parents incurred $250,000 in debt when his father had a heart attack last year.

"It's an exciting moment because my family has never had preventive care," he said. "You are always uncertain about your state of health. Are you healthy?" he said, describing fears he's had about ending up in an emergency room with an advanced form of cancer.

Texas is one of 36 mostly Republican states that haven't built their own exchanges, an online marketplace where people can comparison-shop for health insurance. The state has the highest uninsured rate in the country, with about one-quarter of the population lacking coverage. Gov. Rick Perry has also refused to expand Medicaid despite federal funds to help cover the costs, a move that some say will leave hundreds of thousands of low-income residents uninsured.

But Perry's open disdain for the law apparently did not stop thousands of Texans from trying to enroll when the exchange opened Tuesday.

"We had no idea that there would be this much interest this early," said Ron Cookston, executive director of Gateway to Care, one of several Houston organizations that have hired and trained people to assist with enrollment. "We thought we would have to spend a lot of time outreaching, finding people to get them to be interested."

Instead, the phones at Gateway, which has 15 navigators, have been ringing constantly. By early Wednesday, Laverne Moore said most people were not complaining about the website delays, but instead inquiring about where they could go to sign up in person.

"What do I need to take with me?" Moore said people are asking.

It was unclear how many Texas residents had successfully enrolled.

In the voicemail of a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services employee, the woman noted she wasn't working because of the partial federal government shutdown. The move, which sent 800,000 government workers home, began Tuesday as House Republicans tried to halt funding for the contentious health insurance program that became a law in 2009.

For some, the government's failure to prepare for the volume of traffic is frustrating.

Steve Wolf, a 50-year-old father of two who owns a ranch in Austin used by filmmakers, said he keeps getting error messages. On Wednesday, the website read "we have a lot of visitors on the site right now," and asked users to remain on the page to keep their place in line.

Cecilia Fontenot of Houston, a 63-year-old part-time accountant who lost her health insurance when she was laid off in 2008, said she wasn't put off by the slow pace or by being unable to enroll Tuesday.

Unable to afford her $300 a month diabetes medication with her $2,000-a-month income any longer, Fontenot simply plans on trying again in a few days — either in person or on the website.

"Something good, you always have to have a little patience," Fontenot said.

 

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What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?