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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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Cheesecake Factory gets ready to serve; Sundance tree lighting set

The Cheesecake Factory at Sundance Square will open on Dec. 9, officials with Sundance announced today. The 8,800-square-foot restaurant - being built in the

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Oil falls as US shows signs of patchy growth


PAMELA SAMPSON, AP Business Writer

BANGKOK (AP) — Oil prices fell again Thursday amid worries about the U.S. economy and signs of a slowdown in demand.

Benchmark oil for November delivery was down 33 cents to $102.33 per barrel at midday Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped 47 cents on Wednesday to finish at $102.66 a barrel, the lowest closing price since July 3.

Oil has fallen 7 percent since closing at a two-year high of $110.53 on Sept. 6. Since then, diplomatic efforts have averted a U.S. military strike against Syria, and tense relations between the U.S. and Iran have shown signs of a thaw. As a result, the market has removed the so-called political risk premium from oil, which some analysts put at about $5 to $6 a barrel.

But worries about the U.S. economy continued to trouble traders. Orders for durable goods, which are big ticket items expected to last at least three years, increased a disappointing 0.1 percent in August, held back by a decline in demand for defense aircraft and other military goods.

Meanwhile, demand for so-called core capital goods rose 1.5 percent, not enough to reverse the decline of 3.3 percent the previous month. Core capital goods are a good measure of businesses' confidence in the economy and include items that point to expansion, such as machinery and computers.

"This suggests that businesses continue to remain cautious on spending amidst uncertainties," said Cynthia Kalasopatan of Mizuho bank Ltd. in Singapore in a market commentary.

Meanwhile, supply numbers pointed toward a possible slip in demand. The American Petroleum Institute reported a slight drop in U.S. crude oil for the week ended Sept. 20 while the U.S. Energy Department said supplies increased by 2.6 million barrels that week.

Brent crude, the benchmark for international crudes used by many U.S. refineries, slipped 11 cents to $108.21 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London.

In other energy futures trading on Nymex:

— Wholesale gasoline fell 0.6 cent to $2.651 per gallon.

— Natural gas rose 0.7 cent at $3.50 per 1,000 cubic feet.

— Heating oil fell 1.3 cents to $2.97 per gallon.

 

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