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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Texas has highest uninsured rate, high poverty

 

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas continues to have the highest rate in the country of people without health insurance and ranks among the highest in poverty.

The U.S. Census released data Tuesday that provides a snapshot of how Americans were doing economically in 2012.

Almost 25 percent of Texans did not have health insurance, compared to the national average of 15.4 percent. The rate was much higher among working-age adults, with 32 percent lacking health coverage.

Texas ranked eighth in the nation in poverty, with 17.2 percent of the population living in poverty. For a family of three, that's less than $18,500 a year.

The data shows Texas made no progress in reducing the number of uninsured or the number or people living in poverty, which includes a third of Texas children.

 

48 million Americans without health insurance
By Tami Luhby

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The share of uninsured Americans dipped slightly last year, as more children and near elderly gained health coverage.

The share of uninsured people decreased to 15.4%, from 15.7% a year earlier, according to a Census Bureau report released Tuesday. Some 48 million people were uninsured in 2012, which was not statistically different from the prior year.

Last year, the number of uninsured Americans fell for the first time in four years.

Meanwhile, the share of people relying on the government for health insurance edged up slightly to 32.6%, from 32.2% a year ago. Those covered by Medicaid was not statistically different from a year earlier at 16.4%, while Medicare coverage rose to 15.7%, up from 15.2%.

The Census report comes a few months before a major component of the Affordable Care Act kicks in. Starting in 2014, all Americans will be required to have insurance, whether through their employer or the individual market. Americans who don't have company-sponsored coverage can enroll in insurance plans on state-based exchanges beginning on Oct. 1. About 24 million people are expected to obtain insurance through the exchanges by 2023, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

But Obamacare, as the act is known, did not have a major impact on insurance coverage in 2012, Census officials and experts said. They don't expect to see any significant impact until 2015, when the 2014 figures are reported.

The report does show that companies were not dropping coverage in 2012, ahead of health reform. Some 54.9% of Americans had employment-based plans, not statistically changed from a year earlier, though down from nearly 63% over the past decade.

The two groups that did see coverage gains were children, who benefited from increased private insurance through their parents, and those age 55 to 64, who obtained plans through both employers and Medicaid, said Edwin Park, vice president for health policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a left-leaning group.

The growth in overall Medicaid slowed, however, likely because the poverty rate also remained steady at 15%, said Brett O'Hara, chief of the health and disability statistics branch at Census. Meanwhile, the share of people on Medicare jumped as more Baby Boomers retired.

Whether they have insurance or not, people spent more on health care last year than in 2011. Those with coverage shelled out $2,707 in out-of-pocket expenses, up 4.8%. The uninsured spent $627, up 4.3%.
 

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