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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Fort Worth launching Stockyards design task force

The task force, to be chaired by the Fort Worth architect Eric Hahnfeld, would be responsible for confirming the boundaries of the city's planned Stockyards design district and reviewing the work of a consultant.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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U.S. energy boom could go global

Alanna Petroff

LONDON (CNNMoney) -- The U.S. energy boom could go global.

Energy consultant IHS has identified 23 locations around the world -- from Argentina to West Siberia -- that could together hold roughly 175 billion barrels in recoverable oil, far surpassing the 43 billion barrels estimated to be sitting in North America.

The IHS report highlights the Vaca Muerta area in Argentina and North Africa as two regions with huge reserves of tight oil -- or shale oil -- typically extracted using a process known as fracking.

"This study makes clear that the potential for global tight oil is there and that it is very, very large," said IHS research director Jan Roelofsen.

The energy boom playing out in the U.S. has been driven by companies extracting this kind of oil using fracking -- or hydraulic fracturing -- which involves injecting water, sand and chemicals deep into the ground at high pressure to crack rock and allow oil and gas to flow.

Growth in the fracking industry has helped propel the U.S. out of recession and is reshaping the global oil market as the U.S. becomes less dependent on imports.

But it is a controversial field, with some fearing that fracking contaminates ground water and leads to small earthquakes and tremors. However, many other countries are hoping to jump on the fracking bandwagon to expand their energy production capacity and grow their economies.

Experts say it will take years for other nations to replicate America's energy success. Regulations, restrictions on access to land and the need to conduct extensive testing can slow progress, and it can be difficult and expensive to hire specialized employees and secure equipment.

"Outside of North America, China, Argentina and maybe Poland, most of these resources will not be contributing to global supply until after 2020," said Will Pearson, Eurasia Group's director of global energy and natural resources.

The IHS report examined a total of 148 sites around the world and estimates that these sites could yield nearly 300 billion barrels in tight oil. The study used geological data and comparisons to U.S. sites to create its estimates.

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