Join The Discussion

 

Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

read more >

Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

read more >

Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

read more >

Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

read more >

American Airlines' first 787 Dreamliner arrives at D/FW

American is preparing the plane to begin service sometime in the second quarter.

read more >

 

Board of Ed mulls graduation rules, science books

WILL WEISSERT, Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The State Board of Education is holding two potentially emotionally charged public hearings on high school graduation requirements and what science textbooks should be approved for classrooms across Texas.

Members will hear testimony Tuesday as they devise new graduation standards under a curriculum overhaul overwhelmingly approved by the Legislature this summer.

The law reduced how many standardized tests high school students must pass.

It also rewrote course requirements to promote vocational training rather than strictly college prep classes.

The debate over graduation standards is white-hot. But it may be overshadowed by a second hearing on science books seeking board approval.

That has sparked an outcry from some conservatives. They want creationism, or that a higher power made the universe, taught along with the theory of evolution in science classes statewide.

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?