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Berkshire Hathaway company acquires Fort Worth firm

M&M Manufacturing, a producer of sheet metal products for the air distribution and ventilation market based in Fort Worth, has been acquired by MiTek Industries Inc., a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.,

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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth Superintendent candidate withdraws from consideration

And then there were none. The lone Fort Worth ISD Superintendent candidate, Dr. Joel D. Boyd, has informed the Fort Worth ISD Board of Education that he is

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Board of Ed mulls graduation rules, science books

WILL WEISSERT, Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The State Board of Education is holding two potentially emotionally charged public hearings on high school graduation requirements and what science textbooks should be approved for classrooms across Texas.

Members will hear testimony Tuesday as they devise new graduation standards under a curriculum overhaul overwhelmingly approved by the Legislature this summer.

The law reduced how many standardized tests high school students must pass.

It also rewrote course requirements to promote vocational training rather than strictly college prep classes.

The debate over graduation standards is white-hot. But it may be overshadowed by a second hearing on science books seeking board approval.

That has sparked an outcry from some conservatives. They want creationism, or that a higher power made the universe, taught along with the theory of evolution in science classes statewide.

 

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