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Texas has old, new candidates to offer as presidential hopefuls

The Republican Party has long been riven between its establishment and conservative wings, a split that plays out every four years in the race for the White House.

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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Two Fort Worth Baylor medical properties acquired

Baylor Surgical Hospital of Fort Worth and Baylor Surgical Hospital Integrated Medical Facility are among three facilities acquired by Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II Inc.

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Carmaker saves West Texas drive-in theater: Drive-in claims to have been 'zombie-free since 1977'

Graham Drive In, Graham, Texas. Photo courtesy of Project Drive In. 

To view the zombie film: 

projectdrivein.com/#vote_30

GRAHAM, Texas (AP) — An automaker has presented a West Texas drive-in theater with a digital projector, saving the establishment from an end to Hollywood distribution of 35mm films.

A Friday statement by Honda says its Project Drive-In chose the Graham Drive-In as the third of five U.S. outdoor theaters to be chosen. In the theater's campaign materials is a short film where the owners claim to have been "zombie-free since 1977," or as they say later in the film, "no successful zombie attacks since 1977." 

But the real threat to the drive-is aren't zombies, but the fact that movie studios are phasing out 35 mm film prints, and the switch to an eventually all-digital distribution system is pushing the outdoor theaters with huge screens to make the expensive change to digital projectors. The drive-in theater industry says many of the 350 or so of them remaining could be forced to close because they can't afford to adapt to the digital age.

Graham is a town of about 10,000 residents about 80 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

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Online:

http://www.projectdrivein.com

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