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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Carmaker saves West Texas drive-in theater: Drive-in claims to have been 'zombie-free since 1977'

Graham Drive In, Graham, Texas. Photo courtesy of Project Drive In. 

To view the zombie film: 

projectdrivein.com/#vote_30

GRAHAM, Texas (AP) — An automaker has presented a West Texas drive-in theater with a digital projector, saving the establishment from an end to Hollywood distribution of 35mm films.

A Friday statement by Honda says its Project Drive-In chose the Graham Drive-In as the third of five U.S. outdoor theaters to be chosen. In the theater's campaign materials is a short film where the owners claim to have been "zombie-free since 1977," or as they say later in the film, "no successful zombie attacks since 1977." 

But the real threat to the drive-is aren't zombies, but the fact that movie studios are phasing out 35 mm film prints, and the switch to an eventually all-digital distribution system is pushing the outdoor theaters with huge screens to make the expensive change to digital projectors. The drive-in theater industry says many of the 350 or so of them remaining could be forced to close because they can't afford to adapt to the digital age.

Graham is a town of about 10,000 residents about 80 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

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Online:

http://www.projectdrivein.com

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?