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Ice cancels flights, snarls traffic; snow in North Texas forecast

DALLAS (AP) — More wintry weather was expected across parts of North Texas through Wednesday.

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Riverside: Developer sees revitalization with apartments, townhomes driving commercial projects

A Dallas developer is seeking to rezone more than 18 acres in Fort Worth’s Riverside area overlooking Oakhurst Scenic Drive, the Trinity River and downtown, with plans to build as many as 400 apartments and townhomes aimed at renters who want to live in or near the central city. D

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Einstein Bagels closing two Tarrant locations

Einstein Bagels is closing two Tarrant County locations, part of a series of 39 closings around the country, according to the company’s owners, JAB Holding Co.

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Dallas developer confirmed to build Walsh Ranch in west Fort Worth

Dallas-based Republic Property Group has been chosen to lead Walsh Ranch development as the 7,200-acre residential community takes shape in west Fort Worth.

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Berkshire Hathaway company acquires Fort Worth firm

M&M Manufacturing, a producer of sheet metal products for the air distribution and ventilation market based in Fort Worth, has been acquired by MiTek Industries Inc., a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.,

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Carmaker saves West Texas drive-in theater: Drive-in claims to have been 'zombie-free since 1977'

Graham Drive In, Graham, Texas. Photo courtesy of Project Drive In. 

To view the zombie film: 

projectdrivein.com/#vote_30

GRAHAM, Texas (AP) — An automaker has presented a West Texas drive-in theater with a digital projector, saving the establishment from an end to Hollywood distribution of 35mm films.

A Friday statement by Honda says its Project Drive-In chose the Graham Drive-In as the third of five U.S. outdoor theaters to be chosen. In the theater's campaign materials is a short film where the owners claim to have been "zombie-free since 1977," or as they say later in the film, "no successful zombie attacks since 1977." 

But the real threat to the drive-is aren't zombies, but the fact that movie studios are phasing out 35 mm film prints, and the switch to an eventually all-digital distribution system is pushing the outdoor theaters with huge screens to make the expensive change to digital projectors. The drive-in theater industry says many of the 350 or so of them remaining could be forced to close because they can't afford to adapt to the digital age.

Graham is a town of about 10,000 residents about 80 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

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Online:

http://www.projectdrivein.com

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