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Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

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Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

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Some passengers flying the very, very friendly skies of United

File photos of United Airlines fleet, ticketing counter, plane in air.
Credit: Courtesy United Airlines

Chris Isidore

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- United Airlines briefly, and mistakenly, offered passengers the ultimate fare sale on Thursday -- $0 fares.

The passengers on United's web site were able to book tickets for a time for only the cost of the airport and security fees tacked onto tickets. So travelers were able to get flights for between $5 and $10.

One customer posting on the passenger Web site flyertalk.com bragged about bagging a $10 round trip between San Jose and Boston -- a ticket that might normally cost $600.

United confirmed the mistake but declined to comment on the details of the outage or whether it intends to honor the tickets.

"One of our filings Thursday contained an error which resulted in certain fares being displayed as zero. We have corrected this error," the airline said in a statement. It added that the mistake was made by a person and was not the result of a technology glitch.

Rick Seaney, chief executive of Farecompare.com, said the problem lasted about two hours.

"People were buying tickets all over the place," said Seany. "Guys were buying 12 and 15 of these things from Washington DC and Honolulu. The question is will they honor them?"

-- CNNMoney's Aaron Smith contributed reporting.

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