Join The Discussion

 

Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

read more >

Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

read more >

Fort Worth launching Stockyards design task force

The task force, to be chaired by the Fort Worth architect Eric Hahnfeld, would be responsible for confirming the boundaries of the city's planned Stockyards design district and reviewing the work of a consultant.

read more >

GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Some passengers flying the very, very friendly skies of United

File photos of United Airlines fleet, ticketing counter, plane in air.
Credit: Courtesy United Airlines

Chris Isidore

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- United Airlines briefly, and mistakenly, offered passengers the ultimate fare sale on Thursday -- $0 fares.

The passengers on United's web site were able to book tickets for a time for only the cost of the airport and security fees tacked onto tickets. So travelers were able to get flights for between $5 and $10.

One customer posting on the passenger Web site flyertalk.com bragged about bagging a $10 round trip between San Jose and Boston -- a ticket that might normally cost $600.

United confirmed the mistake but declined to comment on the details of the outage or whether it intends to honor the tickets.

"One of our filings Thursday contained an error which resulted in certain fares being displayed as zero. We have corrected this error," the airline said in a statement. It added that the mistake was made by a person and was not the result of a technology glitch.

Rick Seaney, chief executive of Farecompare.com, said the problem lasted about two hours.

"People were buying tickets all over the place," said Seany. "Guys were buying 12 and 15 of these things from Washington DC and Honolulu. The question is will they honor them?"

-- CNNMoney's Aaron Smith contributed reporting.

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?