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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Look who's 40: GCG Marketing celebrates

ABack in the day, Weekly & Associates.  

.40 years later: GCG Marketing

 

On April Fool’s Day 1973, a new advertising agency named Weekly & Associates opened its doors in Fort Worth.

Today, that same agency, now renamed GCG Marketing, is celebrating its 40th anniversary.

Over the decades, the firm has earned multiple awards, survived countless fads and coped with rapidly-changing technology.

Asked the secret of GCG’s success, President Neil Foster cites staying power. “Times have

changed, but we found our business-to-business marketing niche early on and stuck with it.

That niche has been the constant that helped us weather the decades.”

The agency has changed over the years. The ‘80s brought a rebrand for the agency. Many companies were taking marketing in house at the time,

but management still saw a strong need for graphics and other services, leading to a name change: Graphic Concepts Group.

By the 2000s, the wheel had come back around. Clients started asking for – and receiving – a broader list of services. Graphic Concepts Group was, by all accounts, a full-service advertising agency, but people couldn’t tell by the name. So the agency morphed again, to its current moniker, GCG.

“Success is a matter of staying power,” said Foster. “You have to adapt accordingly. We’ve made it 40 years because we never stopped challenging ourselves – both creatively and in terms of what we can do for our clients.”

 

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