Join The Discussion

 

Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

read more >

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

read more >

Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

read more >

Justice mulling possible sentence reduction for Enron's Skilling
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling, who wasn't scheduled to be released from prison for another 15 years, is trying to hatch a deal with the Feds to shorten his sentence, according to the Justice Department.
"The Department of Justice is considering entering into a sentencing agreement with the defendant in this matter," said the federal agency on Thursday, referring to Skilling.
Skilling, 59, was sentenced to 24 years in 2006, after being convicted of fraud, conspiracy, insider trading and lying to auditors. He was ordered to pay about $50 million in restitution to the victims after orchestrating the largest corporate fraud in history.
Now known as inmate #29296-179, Skilling maintained his innocence throughout the court hearings. He currently resides at the Englewood federal prison in Littleton, Colo., and is scheduled to be released in February 2028.
Enron, an energy trading company, collapsed under the weight of massive fraud perpetrated by some of its executives, and the name is as notorious as that of legendary Ponzi mastermind Bernard Madoff.
The Justice Department would not comment on what precipitated Skilling's resentencing hearing.
The purpose of the announcement is to invite victims, including former Enron employees and stockholders, to participate in Skilling's hearing. The Justice Department said victims have until April 17 to respond but did not say when the hearing would take place.
More than 4,000 Enron employees lost their jobs, and some also lost their life savings, when the company declared bankruptcy in 2001. Investors suffered losses in the billions of dollars.
Skilling's lawyer, Daniel Petrocelli, was not immediately available for comment.
Andrew Fastow, one of Skilling's partners-in-white-collar-crime, was released from prison on Dec. 16, 2011, at least four years early, after making a plea bargain.
Kenneth Lay, who was CEO of Enron before Skilling took over, was also convicted but died in 2006 at 64 while awaiting sentencing.

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?