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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Airlines seek Nov. court date for merger lawsuit

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer


DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways want a trial in the government's lawsuit against their proposed merger to start in November, three months sooner than the date picked by federal officials.

The airlines estimated that the trial would last 10 days, meaning that even if they win, the merger won't close until late this year.

American parent AMR Corp. had hoped to complete the merger and come out of bankruptcy protection in September. It said in a court filing Thursday that the delay is costing AMR $500,000 a day in professional fees such as lawyers' bills for its bankruptcy case.

The merger was steaming toward final approval this month until the U.S. Justice Department and six states threw up a roadblock. They filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Washington, D.C., to stop the merger, saying it will reduce competition and lead to higher fares and extra fees for consumers. The Justice Department favors a trial starting no sooner than Feb. 10.

The case might never get to trial. The airlines are likely to keep trying to negotiate a settlement that would require concessions — at a minimum, giving up takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport outside Washington — but allow the merger to go ahead. Publicly, however, both sides have sounded as if they're ready to fight, not talk.

US Airways Group Inc. CEO Doug Parker, who would run the combined company, said in a message to employees Thursday, "We are eager to get to court so that we can make our case and explain exactly how this merger enhances competition across the US and the globe."

Parker and AMR CEO Tom Horton argue that their merger would help consumers by creating a third giant airline roughly the size of United and Delta. The Justice Department argues that it will hurt competition by leaving just four airlines — United, Delta, Southwest and the post-merger American — controlling more than 80 percent of the U.S. air-travel market.

The airlines asked the court for a Nov. 12 trial. The Justice Department hasn't yet requested a date.
 

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?