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New arena at Will Rogers takes shape


The proposed Will Rogers Memorial Center arena continues to take shape as voters head for a Nov. 4 election to decide whether to approve new taxes to help pay for the $450 million facility.

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Fort Worth-based Woodmont plans $80M Hard Rock Hotel retail center

Woodmont Outlets of Fort Worth, an affiliate of The Woodmont Co., has partnered with Cherokee Nation Businesses for a proposed upscale retail development at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

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Cooking Class: Fort Worth chef brings home the gold

Toques off to Timothy Prefontaine. The executive chef at the iconic Fort Worth Club is currently the best in the nation, according to the American Culinary Federation. Prefontaine earned the title of 2014 U.S.A.’s Chef of the

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Barnett still packs economic punch, study finds

Despite reduced drilling and unstable gas prices, Fort Worth continues reaping the rewards of the Barnett Shale, according to a newly released study by The Perryman Group.7

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Fort Worth firm 'simplifies' advertising

Reaching customers requires more than price slashing and flashy ads. In today’s competitive marketplace, machines – not men and women – are essential to tapping new markets and

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Airlines seek Nov. court date for merger lawsuit

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer


DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways want a trial in the government's lawsuit against their proposed merger to start in November, three months sooner than the date picked by federal officials.

The airlines estimated that the trial would last 10 days, meaning that even if they win, the merger won't close until late this year.

American parent AMR Corp. had hoped to complete the merger and come out of bankruptcy protection in September. It said in a court filing Thursday that the delay is costing AMR $500,000 a day in professional fees such as lawyers' bills for its bankruptcy case.

The merger was steaming toward final approval this month until the U.S. Justice Department and six states threw up a roadblock. They filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Washington, D.C., to stop the merger, saying it will reduce competition and lead to higher fares and extra fees for consumers. The Justice Department favors a trial starting no sooner than Feb. 10.

The case might never get to trial. The airlines are likely to keep trying to negotiate a settlement that would require concessions — at a minimum, giving up takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport outside Washington — but allow the merger to go ahead. Publicly, however, both sides have sounded as if they're ready to fight, not talk.

US Airways Group Inc. CEO Doug Parker, who would run the combined company, said in a message to employees Thursday, "We are eager to get to court so that we can make our case and explain exactly how this merger enhances competition across the US and the globe."

Parker and AMR CEO Tom Horton argue that their merger would help consumers by creating a third giant airline roughly the size of United and Delta. The Justice Department argues that it will hurt competition by leaving just four airlines — United, Delta, Southwest and the post-merger American — controlling more than 80 percent of the U.S. air-travel market.

The airlines asked the court for a Nov. 12 trial. The Justice Department hasn't yet requested a date.
 

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What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?