Join The Discussion

 

Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

read more >

Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

read more >

Fort Worth launching Stockyards design task force

The task force, to be chaired by the Fort Worth architect Eric Hahnfeld, would be responsible for confirming the boundaries of the city's planned Stockyards design district and reviewing the work of a consultant.

read more >

GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Airlines seek Nov. court date for merger lawsuit

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer


DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways want a trial in the government's lawsuit against their proposed merger to start in November, three months sooner than the date picked by federal officials.

The airlines estimated that the trial would last 10 days, meaning that even if they win, the merger won't close until late this year.

American parent AMR Corp. had hoped to complete the merger and come out of bankruptcy protection in September. It said in a court filing Thursday that the delay is costing AMR $500,000 a day in professional fees such as lawyers' bills for its bankruptcy case.

The merger was steaming toward final approval this month until the U.S. Justice Department and six states threw up a roadblock. They filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Washington, D.C., to stop the merger, saying it will reduce competition and lead to higher fares and extra fees for consumers. The Justice Department favors a trial starting no sooner than Feb. 10.

The case might never get to trial. The airlines are likely to keep trying to negotiate a settlement that would require concessions — at a minimum, giving up takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport outside Washington — but allow the merger to go ahead. Publicly, however, both sides have sounded as if they're ready to fight, not talk.

US Airways Group Inc. CEO Doug Parker, who would run the combined company, said in a message to employees Thursday, "We are eager to get to court so that we can make our case and explain exactly how this merger enhances competition across the US and the globe."

Parker and AMR CEO Tom Horton argue that their merger would help consumers by creating a third giant airline roughly the size of United and Delta. The Justice Department argues that it will hurt competition by leaving just four airlines — United, Delta, Southwest and the post-merger American — controlling more than 80 percent of the U.S. air-travel market.

The airlines asked the court for a Nov. 12 trial. The Justice Department hasn't yet requested a date.
 

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?