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Ice cancels flights, snarls traffic; snow in North Texas forecast

DALLAS (AP) — More wintry weather was expected across parts of North Texas through Wednesday.

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Riverside: Developer sees revitalization with apartments, townhomes driving commercial projects

A Dallas developer is seeking to rezone more than 18 acres in Fort Worth’s Riverside area overlooking Oakhurst Scenic Drive, the Trinity River and downtown, with plans to build as many as 400 apartments and townhomes aimed at renters who want to live in or near the central city. D

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Einstein Bagels closing two Tarrant locations

Einstein Bagels is closing two Tarrant County locations, part of a series of 39 closings around the country, according to the company’s owners, JAB Holding Co.

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Dallas developer confirmed to build Walsh Ranch in west Fort Worth

Dallas-based Republic Property Group has been chosen to lead Walsh Ranch development as the 7,200-acre residential community takes shape in west Fort Worth.

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Berkshire Hathaway company acquires Fort Worth firm

M&M Manufacturing, a producer of sheet metal products for the air distribution and ventilation market based in Fort Worth, has been acquired by MiTek Industries Inc., a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.,

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Halliburton employee testifies in Deepwater Horizon trial

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A man who worked for BP's cement contractor on the drilling rig that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 testified Tuesday that he didn't believe the oil giant's employees were risking workers' safety when they didn't follow his recommendations.
Halliburton employee Jesse Gagliano, a witness for his employer at a trial over the Deepwater Horizon disaster that killed 11 people, said his relationship with employees for London-based BP PLC deteriorated amid disagreements about how to perform the cement job that ultimately failed to seal the BP-owned well.
But Gagliano said he said he never saw a reason to call a temporary halt to the project before the well's blowout.
"At any time when you recommended to BP something and they did not follow your recommendation, did you think at any time that that created a risk of a hazard?" Halliburton attorney Donald Godwin asked.
"No," Gagliano responded.
The trial, which has entered its sixth week, is designed to determine what caused the blowout of BP's Macondo well and assign fault to the companies involved. BP will begin presenting its defense once Halliburton rests its case, possibly later this week.
Gagliano invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination at his 2011 deposition but later agreed to testify at trial. He previously had been interviewed by a congressional committee and testified in 2010 before a government panel probing the disaster. BP had argued that Gagliano's late change of heart would give Halliburton an unfair strategic advantage, but a judge permitted Gagliano to testify.
Gagliano said BP had the ultimate responsibility for deciding how the cement job would be performed and didn't always follow his recommendations.
For instance, Gagliano had recommended the use of 21 centralizers, which are devices designed to ensure the casing is running down the center of the well bore. BP, however, decided to use only six centralizers for the cement job.
Gagliano said his models showed that using only six centralizers indicated "severe gas flow potential." A report that BP issued for its investigation of the blowout concluded that using six centralizers instead of 21 likely wasn't a factor in the cement job's failure.
During the trial's opening statements, a plaintiffs' attorney accused Halliburton of using leftover cement on the Macondo well that contained a destabilizing additive in an effort to save time and save money.
Gagliano said he used his best engineering judgment and, even in hindsight, wouldn't have changed anything about his design for the cementing project.
"While there were agreements and disagreements, do you believe that the two groups, Halliburton and BP, tried to work together to come up with a design of the cement slurry that was going to work in that well?" Godwin asked.
"Yes," Gagliano said.


 

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