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Moves by Jeb Bush add to talk of 2016 candidacy

WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush's decision to release a policy-laden e-book and all his emails from his time as governor of Florida has further stoked expectations among his allies that he will launch a presidential bid.

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Ebby Halliday acquires Fort Worth’s Williams Trew

Williams Trew Real Estate of Fort Worth has been acquired by Dallas-based residential real estate brokerage Ebby Halliday Real Estate Inc.

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Taking the Cake: Sundance had pursued Cheesecake Factory for many years

The Cheesecake Factory had been on the white board over at Sundance Square management for some time

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Fort Worth businessman to lead Abbott, Patrick inauguration efforts

Fort Worth businessman Ardon Moore will chair the committee running inauguration festivities for Gov.-elect Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov.-elect Dan Patrick in January, it was announced on Friday.   Moore, president of Lee M. Bass Inc. in Fort Worth, is a vice chairman of the University of Texas Investment

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Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

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Halliburton employee testifies in Deepwater Horizon trial

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A man who worked for BP's cement contractor on the drilling rig that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 testified Tuesday that he didn't believe the oil giant's employees were risking workers' safety when they didn't follow his recommendations.
Halliburton employee Jesse Gagliano, a witness for his employer at a trial over the Deepwater Horizon disaster that killed 11 people, said his relationship with employees for London-based BP PLC deteriorated amid disagreements about how to perform the cement job that ultimately failed to seal the BP-owned well.
But Gagliano said he said he never saw a reason to call a temporary halt to the project before the well's blowout.
"At any time when you recommended to BP something and they did not follow your recommendation, did you think at any time that that created a risk of a hazard?" Halliburton attorney Donald Godwin asked.
"No," Gagliano responded.
The trial, which has entered its sixth week, is designed to determine what caused the blowout of BP's Macondo well and assign fault to the companies involved. BP will begin presenting its defense once Halliburton rests its case, possibly later this week.
Gagliano invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination at his 2011 deposition but later agreed to testify at trial. He previously had been interviewed by a congressional committee and testified in 2010 before a government panel probing the disaster. BP had argued that Gagliano's late change of heart would give Halliburton an unfair strategic advantage, but a judge permitted Gagliano to testify.
Gagliano said BP had the ultimate responsibility for deciding how the cement job would be performed and didn't always follow his recommendations.
For instance, Gagliano had recommended the use of 21 centralizers, which are devices designed to ensure the casing is running down the center of the well bore. BP, however, decided to use only six centralizers for the cement job.
Gagliano said his models showed that using only six centralizers indicated "severe gas flow potential." A report that BP issued for its investigation of the blowout concluded that using six centralizers instead of 21 likely wasn't a factor in the cement job's failure.
During the trial's opening statements, a plaintiffs' attorney accused Halliburton of using leftover cement on the Macondo well that contained a destabilizing additive in an effort to save time and save money.
Gagliano said he used his best engineering judgment and, even in hindsight, wouldn't have changed anything about his design for the cementing project.
"While there were agreements and disagreements, do you believe that the two groups, Halliburton and BP, tried to work together to come up with a design of the cement slurry that was going to work in that well?" Godwin asked.
"Yes," Gagliano said.


 

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Did the College Football Playoff Committee get it right?