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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Government reverses plan to cut Medicare Advantage rate

Ferre Dollar/CNN

By Jen Christensen

CNN) -- The federal government has reversed a proposed cut that could have left millions who get their health insurance through the Medicare Advantage plan paying more for coverage.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced Monday the final Medicare Advantage rates for 2014.

CMS had initially proposed a 2.3% reduction in what the government pays the insurance companies that provide the plans -- a move that would have saved the government money but potentially would cost the public more.

However, CMS on Monday announced a 3.3% increase instead.

Insurance companies were upset by the proposed cut, and spent the public comment period time lobbying legislators and running ads against it.

Ads from the America's Health Insurance Plans' Coalition for Medicare Choices called the proposal "drastic" and "too much" and featured seniors saying they can't afford to pay more for health care.

About 25% of the 47 million Americans on Medicare pay more to have Medicare Advantage. The plans are run by private insurance companies that are reimbursed by the government for doing so.

The plans vary, but they offer the elderly more than they would get with regular Medicare. Most plans offer prescription drug coverage; some also offer dental and vision. All the plans cap a person's out-of-pocket expenses, while regular Medicare does not.

Seniors won't know what their out-of-pocket costs will be until the fall, when insurance companies put in their bids for government work.

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