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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth Chamber names Small Business of the Year winners

A trampoline recreation business; an oilfield services company; a longtime aviation maintenance firm; a maker of electrical wiring harnesses. Those were the wide variety of businesses that received the 2015 Small Business of the Year Award from the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Local research may lead to higher cancer screening participation

Moncrief Cancer Center

A study conducted by UT Southwestern’s Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, in conjunction with the Simmons Cancer Center and the Moncrief Cancer Institute, in collaboration with JPS Health Network suggests changes be made to the standard of care strategy for colorectal screenings.
The study, published in the Aug. 5 edition of JAMA Internal Medicine, looked at nearly 6,000 North Texas patients. The findings showed that participation rates soared depending on the screening method offered and how patient outreach was done.


The results also suggest that a noninvasive colorectal screening approach, such as a fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) might be more effective in prompting participation in potentially lifesaving colon cancer screening among underserved populations than a colonoscopy, a more expensive and invasive procedure.
FIT, a quick test that requires no special preparation, detects small amounts of hidden blood in a patient’s stool sample. Completed tests are then mailed to a laboratory for analysis. The findings presented in the published paper showed that with the help of a mail campaign, FIT participation tripled, and colonoscopy participation doubled in the study sample.


In the investigation, uninsured patients at John Peter Smith (JPS) Health Network in Fort Worth ages 54 to 64 years and not up to date with their screenings were mailed invitations to use and return a no-cost FIT, or to schedule a no-cost colonoscopy. Both groups also received follow-up telephone calls to promote testing.


“The study suggests that the best approach to offering and delivering screening to underserved populations may be through FIT,” said senior author Dr. Celette Sugg Skinner, associate director of population science and cancer control for the Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center in a news release. “Questions for the future are whether superior participation can be maintained in the FIT group [because the test must be repeated every year] and how adherence rates will impact overall screening effectiveness and cost.”
Study authors say the findings raise the possibility that cost-effective, large-scale public health efforts to boost screening may be more successful if noninvasive tests, such as FIT, are offered along with colonoscopy screenings.
Other UT Southwestern researchers involved were Dr. Ethan A. Halm, chief of the division of General Internal Medicine; Dr. Chul Ahn, professor of clinical science; Dr. Keith Argenbright, director of the Moncrief Cancer Institute; Dr. Jasmin Tiro, assistant professor of clinical science; Dr. Sandi Pruitt, assistant professor of clinical science; Luisa Valdez, clinical data specialist at the Simmons Cancer Center; Liyue Tong, biostatistical consultant II in clinical science; and Zhuo Geng, a student at UT Southwestern Medical School. The study’s first author is Dr. Samir Gupta, associate professor of clinical medicine at UCSD. Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina also participated.

Primary funding was provided by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas . Additional funding was provided by National Institutes of Health grants.
 

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