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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Fort Worth minority business receives nationwide grant

Cuevas Distribution Inc., a minority- and woman-owned business in Fort Worth, is one of 20 small businesses nationwide to receive a $150,000 grant from Chase as part of the Mission Main Street program.

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Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

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Mercury studies among suggestions for Texas gas co. fine
 

MICHELLE R. SMITH, Associated Press
 
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Environmentalists are urging a federal judge to consider setting aside money to fund mercury studies, a program to reduce food waste and other projects as possible punishments for a Texas gas company convicted of an environmental crime in Rhode Island.
Southern Union Co. of Houston was convicted of improperly storing mercury at a dilapidated warehouse in Pawtucket. Teenaged vandals eventually got into the warehouse and spilled the mercury, making many people sick.
After the U.S. Supreme Court overturned an $18 million penalty, U.S. District Judge William Smith said he was limited to fining the company $500,000 and asked environmentalists for ideas on how to punish the company.
One proposal aims to clean up a school next to where the mercury was spilled. Another would collect compact fluorescent lamps from hardware stores.
 

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