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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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European watchdog approves US Airways, AMR merger

 

AMSTERDAM (AP) — European authorities have cleared US Airways Group Inc.'s proposed merger with American Airlines' parent company, AMR Corp. — on the condition that they give up one slot at London's Heathrow airport and take steps to foster competition on the London-Philadelphia route.

The merger and restructuring plan, which would create the world's biggest airline, must still be approved by a U.S. federal judge before AMR can emerge from bankruptcy, with a hearing expected Aug. 15.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Justice is still reviewing the deal amid complaints that it could lead to reduced competition and higher fares in the U.S.

Joaquin Almunia, the top competition official at the European Commission, the EU's executive branch, said in a statement that the Philadelphia route would have been monopolized without concessions agreed to provisionally by the two airlines.

"On all other transatlantic routes affected by the merger the combined entity will continue to face competition from other strong competitors," including groups led by Delta, United, and Virgin, he said.

European approval for the deal has long been expected, but in the U.S. the situation may be more complicated, despite approval for the deal last week by US Airways shareholders.

In addition to the Justice Department, a number of states have asked for insight into the deal's details, presumably to ensure that hubs and routes touching their regional interests are being preserved.

The companies have said they expect to close the deal by the end of September.
 

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