Join The Discussion

 

Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

read more >

Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

read more >

GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

read more >

Quebec explosion highlights risk of oil transport

 

MATTHEW DALY,Associated Press

 

 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The explosion of a runaway oil train in Canada highlights the risks that come from transporting oil, no matter the method.

Spills from rail cars occur more frequently than from pipelines, but tend to be smaller. Pipelines can be built to avoid population centers and fragile ecosystems, while trains travel routes where such concerns often were not weighed.

The Quebec disaster on Saturday that by Monday evening was blamed for more than a dozen deaths underscores a trend in which North America's oil is increasingly transported by train, as plans for new pipelines stall and existing lines struggle to keep up with demand.

Since 2009, the number of train cars carrying crude oil hauled by major railroads has jumped nearly 20-fold, to an estimated 200,000 last year.

Much of that comes from the Bakken oil patch in North Dakota and Montana, including the oil that spilled Saturday in Quebec. Because of limited pipeline capacity in the Bakken region and in Canada, oil producers are increasingly using railroads to transport oil to refineries. The train that derailed early Saturday was on its way to a refinery in New Brunswick in eastern Canada.

All but one of the train's 73 tanker cars were carrying oil when they somehow came loose, sped downhill nearly seven miles into the town of Lac-Megantic, near the Maine border, and derailed, with at least five cars exploding. It was not clear how fast the cars were moving when they derailed.

The Canadian Railway Association estimates that as many as 140,000 carloads of crude oil will be shipped on Canada's tracks this year — up from 500 carloads in 2009. The Quebec disaster is the fourth freight train accident in Canada this year involving crude oil shipments.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who has been pushing the Obama administration to approve the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast, has called railroad transit "far more environmentally challenging" than pipelines. Harper says the 1,700-mile (2,735-kilometer) Keystone project, which would carry oil derived from tar sands in western Canada to refineries in Texas, is crucial to his country's economic well-being.

"The only real immediate environmental issue here is, do we want to increase the flow of oil from Canada by pipeline or via rail?" Harper said during a visit to New York in May.

Fadel Gheit, an energy analyst at Oppenheimer & Co. Inc., said it would be a mistake to view the Quebec disaster as a boost for the Keystone project.

"It's almost jumping from the frying pan into the fire. I look better because the other guy looks worse," Gheit said Monday.

Gheit, who supports the Keystone pipeline, said Harper and other pipeline proponents will need to persuade the Obama administration on the project's merits, rather than the dangers of rail.

"If I have a choice of importing oil from Canada, Venezuela or Saudi Arabia, where would I feel much better with?" he asked, calling the answer obvious.

Kate Collarulli of the Sierra Club said pitting railroads against pipelines was a false choice.

"To say we have to choose between rail and pipelines is cynical and defeatist," she said, calling oil a "dangerous fuel" no matter how it is transported.

A report by the U.S. State Department this spring said that development of tar sands in Alberta would create greenhouse gases, but makes clear that other methods of transporting the oil — including rail, trucks and barges — also pose a risk to the environment. For instance, a scenario that would move the oil on trains to mostly existing pipelines would release 8 percent more greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide than Keystone XL, the report said.

Even without the pipeline, extraction of oil from the tar sands is likely to proceed, the report said.

The Sierra Club and other pipeline opponents challenge that idea, noting that while light crude from the Bakken is relatively easy to move by rail, moving the heavier tar sands oil by rail faces significant economic and logistical obstacles.

The Association of American Railroads, an industry trade group, declined to comment on the Quebec disaster, citing the ongoing investigation and the loss of life. But in a "fact sheet" produced before the July 6 explosion, the group said that 99.9 percent of all rail-bound hazardous materials shipments reach their destination without incident. Over the past 10 years, the number of rail cars containing hazardous material that were damaged or derailed declined by 38 percent, according to the Federal Railroad Administration.

The Association of Oil Pipe Lines called pipelines the safest way to deliver crude oil and petroleum products. In 2012, U.S. pipelines transported more than 13.5 billion barrels of crude oil, gasoline, diesel and jet fuel across the nation, with 99.99 of those reaching their destination safely, the group said.

Large mainline pipes, like the proposed Keystone XL, historically have faced a very low incident rate, the group said.


 

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?