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Bicycling, fitness center, rooftop bar coming to Clearfork's Trailhead

An 11,000-square-foot bicycling and fitness center is headed for the Trailhead at Clearfork on the Trinity River in west Fort Worth, Cassco Development said Wednesday.

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Glen Garden rezoning for distillery, attraction, goes forward on 7-2 Fort Worth council vote

Fort Worth Mayor Pro Tem W.B. "Zim" Zimmerman moved to approve the rezoning on a substitute motion, after Council member Kelly Allen Gray initially moved to deny the case.

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Residential land at Chisholm Trail Ranch purchased

Stratford Land, Legacy Capital Co. and the Walton Group of Cos. have snapped up 268 acres of residential land at Chisholm Trail Ranch in Fort Worth.

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Fort Worth to consider adopting 15-year Cavile Place redevelopment plan

The 300-unit Cavile Place housing project in Southeast Fort Worth would be razed and replaced in phases, with a significant number of the units redistributed into the neighborhood.

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Fort Worth payment processor acquired by pension plan group

Fort Worth-based First American Payment Systems has been acquired by an investor group led by the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan (Teachers’), with participation of members of the First American management team.

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Playboy told to remove sign from West Texas road
MARFA, Texas (AP) — A Texas agency says Playboy has 45 days to remove a neon-lit 40-foot high sculpture of the magazine's iconic bunny logo from a West Texas road.

The Texas Department of Transportation ordered the removal of the sign, called "Playboy Marfa," because Playboy does not have a license for outdoor advertisement in Texas.The El Paso Times reports officials representing Playboy said the company has not violated any laws and will try to resolve the agency's concerns.

Officials were alerted about the sign after Marfa resident Lineaus Lorette filed a complaint. "I thought it was a sign — a corporate logo. And in Texas you can't put up signs without permits," Lorette said. "I checked and it didn't have a permit so I filed a complaint."

Lorette says some Marfa residents are upset the company has used their town, known as a hub for artists, for marketing purposes.

"I was really ambivalent. It's a beautifully made sign," Lorette said. "The problem is that it's a sign. The rules have to apply to everybody."

Veronica Beyer, TxDOT's director of media relations in Austin said that the agency is treating the case like any other instance in which someone puts up a roadside advertisement without a license in an area that does not qualify.

The sign is part of a roadside art display designed by New York contemporary artist Richard Phillips and Playboy's creative director of special projects Neville Wakefield. The installation features the offending sign perched atop a post and a concrete platform displaying a stylized version of 1972 Dodge Charger, a classic American "muscle car."

PR Consulting, a firm that represents Playboy said that they do not consider that "the art installation by Richard Phillips violates any laws, rules or regulations. Our legal counsel is currently looking into this matter and we hope to resolve this issue satisfactorily and as quickly as possible."

Located in the heart of West Texas, Marfa is known as a hub for artists and creative types. It is also no stranger to out-of-the-ordinary roadside art exhibitions. Prada Marfa, an installation that mimics one of the high-end fashion brand's stores in the middle of a pasture was erected in 2005 along the same road as the Playboy display.

 

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