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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Icahn changes tactics on Dell

NEW YORK (AP) — Activist investor Carl Icahn on Tuesday proposed a $16 billion share buyback in his latest effort to thwart Dell Inc. founder Michael Dell's effort to take the struggling computer maker private.

Icahn, now the company's second-largest shareholder after buying 72 million shares from fellow activist investor Southeastern Asset Management Inc., wants the company to buy back up to 1.1 billion Dell shares at $14 apiece to boost shareholders' return on their investment. The price of the buyback would represent about two-thirds of Dell's current market value of about $23.5 billion.

Dell and other personal computer makers have seen their sales crumble because of the growing popularity of smartphones and tablets. In May, Dell posted a 79 percent decline in earnings for the most recent quarter. Michael Dell believes he can turn the company around by taking it private and diversifying into niches, such as business software, data storage and consulting. He and the investment firm Silver Lake Partners are bidding to take the company private for $24.4 billion, or $13.65 per share.

But Icahn and Southeastern say that offer short-changes shareholders and originally proposed that the Round Rock, Texas, company instead give shareholders a special dividend of $12 in cash or stock per share. That would have allowed shareholders to get cash and stay invested in the company.

Dell's board rejected that proposal and has asked shareholders to approve the offer from Michael Dell and Silver Lake in a July 18 vote. In a letter to shareholders on Tuesday, Icahn wrote that he's concluded that Dell's board will never accept his dividend proposal over Michael Dell's offer, and thus is pushing for the buyback to boost shareholder value.

Dell shares rose 7 cents Tuesday to finish at $13.48, a sign that investors aren't taking Icahn very seriously and still expect the buyout deal to go through.

Icahn is now the company's biggest independent shareholder with about 152.5 million shares or an 8.7 percent stake, second only to Michael Dell's 273 million shares, or 15.6 percent stake. Southeastern now holds about 74 million shares, or a 4.2 percent stake.

A special committee of Dell's board said Tuesday that Icahn's latest proposal lacks adequate financing or a commitment from anyone to participate. The proposal "would likely force shareholders to continue to own shares in the highly leveraged company that would result," it added.

Icahn contends that the proposed share buyback would be paid for with $5.2 billion in debt, $7.5 billion in Dell cash and $2.9 billion from the sale of Dell receivables. He said he would make available $2 billion if needed, and said that a major investment bank, which was not named, has agreed to put up $1.6 billion.

Icahn said he and Southeastern would not tender their shares into the $14 per share offer. Other shareholders would be able to sell at least 72 percent of their positions.


 

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