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Justin: These boots are made for sellin'

 

Fort Worth Business Press 40 Under 40 boots made by Justin. Photo by Alyson Peyton Perkins.

A. Lee Graham
Reporter

Justin Boot Co., among Fort Worth-based Justin Brands’ businesses, has sold a record 1,000-plus pairs of boots in slightly more than 10 hours, an average of more than one and a half pairs per minute.
The retailer achieved that milestone using Conductiv’s cloud-based Interact app at the point of sale at a pop-up retail shop at the recent shareholder meeting of its parent company, Berkshire Hathaway.
“This exceeded even our most optimistic projections,” said Chuck Schmalbach, vice president of sales and administration, commenting in a news release.
“There is simply no way we could have sold anywhere near this amount of product in such a limited retail space without Conductiv and their Channel Partner Retail Information Systems,” Schmalbach said.  
Justin credits the iPad app for allowing sales employees to sell beyond the limited product inventory of the small booth. That’s because they had visibility and access to the company’s complete inventory and product line.
“It was really impressive to see,” Schmalbach said. “Very few people at the meeting wound up leaving that booth without buying a new pair of boots. And they were able to move people in and out so quickly. It was like looking straight into the future of retailing.”
 

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