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Dallas construction firm to oversee Fort Worth projects

A Dallas construction firm has been awarded the Hemphill Street Connector and Village Creek peak flow storage projects in Fort Worth.

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McDonald's ordered to pay $27M in deaths of teens

BRYAN, Texas (AP) – A Central Texas jury on Wednesday ordered McDonald's to pay $27 million in actual damages to the families of two teenagers killed in a car accident while en route to a hospital after a fight outside the fast-food restaurant.

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San Antonio joins Fort Worth, other cities in AT&T faster Internet rollout

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — AT&T has announced it will bring faster internet service to the San Antonio area.

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Texas Health Resources names Berdan next CEO

Barclay E. Berdan, chief operating officer for Texas Health Resources, has been named the new CEO of the health system effective Sept. 1.

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Fort Worth doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

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Perry adds road funding to special session

CHRIS TOMLINSON,Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Halfway through the special session, Gov. Rick Perry asked lawmakers on Monday to come up with new funding for transportation projects.

In a statement Perry said the state's growing economy and population made additional spending on roads and bridges necessary.

"As we enjoy the benefits of a booming economy, we have to build and maintain the roads to ensure we sustain both our economic success and our quality of life," Perry said.

In January, Perry called on the Legislature to take $3.7 billion from the state's rainy day fund for infrastructure. Lawmakers agreed to ask voters to approve spending $2 billion from the rainy day fund for water projects, but they did not pass a bill for highways.

Perry called the Legislature into special session on May 27 to approve new political maps, a process that has turned out to be slow-going. Special sessions may only run for 30 days, so lawmakers only have 15 days left to finish redistricting and approve more money for roads.

The governor's announcement also follows close on the heels of conservative criticism that the state is spending too much money this year.

Perry's call will give lawmakers a lot of latitude, saying that they should pass "legislation relating to the funding of transportation infrastructure projects."

State transportation leaders told lawmakers during the regular session that Texas needs to spend about $4 billion more per year on roads, even after a decade-long spike in highway construction and maintenance.

Phil Wilson, executive director of the state Department of Transportation, warned that without extra money, the state faces a "perfect storm" of more people using Texas roads, increased construction costs and unreliable federal funding that could leave motorists stuck in traffic.

The agency manages nearly 200 million miles of roads and more than 50,000 bridges. The agency largely relies on a 20 cents-a-gallon fuel tax that hasn't been raised since 1991.

Since 2003, the state has also used bonds and other short-term revenue sources to build and maintain roads. But much of that money will be gone by 2015, and state lawmakers are considering ways to pay for a transportation system that Perry and others say is vital to the state's economy.

When asked whether the governor would add additional items to the special session, spokeswoman Lucy Nashed said this was all "for now."
 

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Training camp is starting this week. How will the Dallas Cowboys do this season?