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Mixed-use complex at Fort Worth TRE parking lot could cost $60 million

A design panel proposes two buildings on Trinity Railway Express lot on Near Southside, with a mix of apartments, retail, office and parking, and frontage on West Vickery and views across I-30 and overlooking downtown.

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Trinity Terrace to build 23-story River Tower

Trinity Terrace, the Fort Worth retirement community that overlooks the Trinity River downtown, plans to launch construction in November on a 23-story River Tower, the nonprofit that owns the property said Friday.

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Fort Worth-area human resource awards seeks nominations

The Fort Worth Human Resource Management Association (FWHRMA) has announced their inaugural Human Resource Professional of the Year Award.

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Downtown Fort Worth TIF board extends two free parking leases

The short-term extensions for the City Center and 777 Main free parking leases, two of six downtown garages that offer free night and weekend parking paid for by the TIF, come as the TIF board debates best uses for its tax dollars as the district enters its final 10 years.

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Promises kept, memories secured as bank’s 1964 time capsule is recovered

Eddie Gale fulfilled his promise. Family legend had it that, 50 years ago, construction worker Gale had placed a letter for his family in a

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Lockheed helps sponsor minority engineering project

Local students try out hands-on STEM activities on board the Trailblazer II.

J. Parker Ragland
Special to the Business Press

The Texas Alliance for Minorities in Engineering (TAME) unveiled the Trailblazer II, a 40-foot-long trailer containing exhibits that encourage students to pursue academic careers in STEM areas, at the Lockheed Martin Fort Worth facility on June 5.
Trailblazer II will be touring Texas and giving students the opportunity to explore the science of space, energy, weather, aerodynamics and biotechnology, part of an effort to interest and engage students in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, also known as STEM.
“We’re here because we share a common mission and a common passion: STEM,” said Bridget Lauderdale, vice president of Lockheed Martin and general manager of the Aeronautics Operation. “TAME has led a relentless pursuit of capturing the hearts and minds of minority students to encourage them first to pursue college and then to pursue careers in science, engineering, technology and math.”
A large discrepancy exists in the field of engineering: the majority of the U.S. population is female, though only 12 percent of the nation’s engineers are women. Furthermore, African American, Hispanic and Native American engineers combined comprise less than 10 percent of the field. TAME aims to lessen this discrepancy and offer otherwise unavailable opportunities to students from underrepresented 
communities.
Since 1976, TAME, a statewide nonprofit organization, has worked to enhance students’ abilities to pursue meaningful careers in science, technology, engineering and math. It has partnered with educators, businesses, the government, and families to “inform, educate, and motivate students.” By focusing its efforts toward underrepresented populations, the organization promotes diversity in STEM careers.
“The Trailblazer program is a key piece of the TAME portfolio,” said Savita Raj, executive director of TAME. “Having a Trailblazer, especially one as eye-catching as this one, pull up to a school can be pretty exciting. We think that it will even spark an interest in those kids who are too cool to care about science and engineering.”
“Eighteen years ago … I remember looking at maps,” Raj explained to her audience, which included a group of students from the Metroplex who had participated in TAME. “Over the next 18 years, or even, I’m thinking, six years when these students graduate, I don’t know what the world will be like. It’s going to be so exciting, but how do we prepare them for that? And, it’s not a certain set of skills, but it would be a certain way of thinking – an engineering way of thinking. The TAME programs have all been designed with just that in mind, and the Trailblazer is a critical part.”
The Trailblazer program was developed to target students in grades three through eight, specifically to inspire them to pursue careers in the physical sciences.
“Lockheed Martin shares TAME’s vision to promote diversity in these critical career fields,” said Lauderdale. “We believe that investing in our youth will ultimately enable us to continue driving innovation, as evidenced by the F-16 and F-35 fighter jets we build at this very facility.”
TAME, teaming with five large corporations including Lockheed Martin, 3M, BASF, Boeing, Shell and TAME board members, raised more than $250,000 to launch the Trailblazer II. Projections indicate that the Trailblazers will reach out to more than 200,000 students while traveling over 300,000 miles visiting schools throughout Texas.
 

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